Date & Time:
June 3, 2019 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Location:
Crerar 390, 5730 S. Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL,
06/03/2019 03:00 PM 06/03/2019 04:00 PM America/Chicago Jungsang Kim (Duke) – Progress in Trapped Ion Quantum Computing Crerar 390, 5730 S. Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL,

Progress in Trapped Ion Quantum Computing

Trapped ions are one of the leading candidates for realizing practically useful quantum computers. Introduction of advanced integration technologies to this traditional atomic physics research has provided an opportunity to convert a complex atomic physics experiment into a stand-alone programmable quantum computer. In this presentation, I will discuss the new enabling technologies that changes the perception of a trapped ion system as a scalable quantum computer, and the concrete progress made to date in this endeavor.    
 

Host: Fred Chong

Jungsang Kim

Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University

Jungsang Kim received his Bachelor’s degree in Physics from Seoul National University in 1992, and his Ph.D. in Physics from Stanford University in 1999 on the topic of generation and detection of single photon states. He joined Bell Laboratories in 1999, where he spent five years working on optical and wireless communication systems. He joined the Electrical and Computer Engineering department at Duke University in 2004, where he has worked on trapped ion quantum computing, high pixel-count imaging systems, and novel quantum device research. He has led many collaborative research projects on quantum computing and communications. In 2015, he co-founded IonQ, focusing on commercial development of ion trap based quantum computer.

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